A new year message from David Attenborough

“With the new year comes the opportunity for change. And if we act in 2021, we can make a world of difference. Together, we can turn things around. Together, we can restore our fragile home and make it a happy new year for all the inhabitants of planet Earth.” 

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From this morning’s Metro News paper from the capital:

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Sir David Attenborough has set us off on the right path for the new year after delivering a heartfelt message during the fireworks display to welcome us into 2021. 

The natural historian narrated the stunning fireworks display in London last night as the event aired on BBC One to usher in the new chapter. 

‘Happy New Year. Our plant is unique. A living world of diversity and wonder. It’s also fragile,’ Sir David began as drones gathered to form the shape of Africa inside a turtle. ‘With the new year comes the opportunity for change. And if we act in 2021, we can make a world of difference. Together, we can turn things around. Together, we can restore our fragile home and make it a happy new year for all the inhabitants of planet Earth.’ 

It’s safe to say that Sir David warmed hearts across the country with viewers praising the TV legend for bringing us into 2021 with positivity. 

Sir David Attenborough welcomes us into 2021 with heartfelt message | Metro News

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And Sir David has certainly shown us the value of how understanding planet Earth can lead to making a world of difference, with a further message today:

David Attenborough’s New Year message (mankind & climate change) (Global) BBC News – 1 January 2021 – YouTube

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Taking one exampleof understanding the planet, for years now he’s been a champion of ‘citizen science’ – where individual actions can make a difference:

Sir David Attenborough explains how important YOU are to understanding the natural world. | watch | Facebook

For example, at a butterfly count:

I think citizen science is a very useful and enriching development, and it’s useful in practical terms of science. To get 44,000 people providing you with detailed statistics is a very valuable thing. But it’s also a way of people enjoying themselves — it isn’t as if we’re saying this is a terrible hardship what we’ve got to do, it’s fun.

Exclusive interview: Sir David Attenborough on citizen science – BirdGuides

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And the BBC has a lot of info on how to get involved:

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Why take part in citizen science?

From astronomy to zoology, wildlife surveys to exploring diaries from the First World War – if you have a passion or a curious mind there should be a project to suit you.

Getting Started

Zooniverse has a wide range of online citizen science projects – from hunting for comets, to tagging penguins, to exploring the secret lives of artists through their notebooks. And microvolunteering site Help from Home has a section specifically devoted to citizen science opportunities

There are a huge number of nature related surveys to get involved with. Some are ongoing, such as the British Trust for Ornithology’s Garden BirdWatch and The Woodland Trusts’ Nature’s Calendar, which tracks the seasons. Others cover a specific time period – like the Big Butterfly Count in July and August or the Garden BioBlitz which is for 24 hours in June.

Countryside surveys is a way of finding a survey that’s specific to your local area. And OPAL has lots of family friendly activities like worm and bug counts.

If you are really smitten the Natural History Museum, apart from having their own projects for you to take part in, even has downloadable resources to enable you to set up your very own citizen science project.

BBC – Do Something Great – Citizen science

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The Sid Valley Biodiversity Group is basically a citizen science group, collecting information about the area’s wildlife through a volunteer network:

Sid Valley Biodiversity Group: projects in the press – Vision Group for Sidmouth

And it’s been involved in several national projects too:

Citizen science in lock-down – Vision Group for Sidmouth

Citizen science: what butterflies to spot in your garden – Vision Group for Sidmouth

Gardenwatch: citizen science in your back garden – Vision Group for Sidmouth

With more coming up in 2021…

Sid Valley Biodiversity

   
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