Making food waste a resource

“From a beer made from crumpets to gin distilled from supermarket grapes, we test the upcycled foods that taste good as well as do good…”

“Want to stop the rot and prevent good food from going to landfill? Here’s our list of the top five most wasted foods and how to use them up.”

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We waste an awful lot of food:

Roughly one-third of the food we produce annually is never eaten, food which it takes a combined land mass roughly the size of China to produce. It will, therefore, come as no surprise that the environmental impacts of this are huge. But what actually happens to all that food waste in landfills?

What happens to food waste in landfills? The full environmental impact – Innovate Eco

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Instead, we can see this as a resource – and there are lots of ideas about:

Where does food waste go in the end? | Too Good To Go

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Today’s Daily Mail looks at the growing interest to make money from food waste:

After the excesses of Christmas and New Year, we’re all looking for ways to cut down on waste and make our food go a little further. And so are our food producers.

Last January, the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) revealed that the UK throws away 9.5 million tonnes of perfectly edible food a year. For firms, such waste is also likely to harm profitability and inflate food prices. WRAP has estimated that the cost of avoidable food waste can vary from 38p to £1 for every meal served in the hospitality sector. So no wonder there’s been a surge in start-ups focusing on re-inventing food ‘waste’ and turning it into tasty, inventive products.

From a beer made from crumpets to gin distilled from supermarket grapes, we test the upcycled foods that taste good as well as do good…

Could you stomach the new eco fad to turn leftover food into posh nosh? | Daily Mail Online

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Hugh F-W gives out a few practical suggestions:

But the buck doesn’t just stop with big businesses; we have a responsibility as individuals to reduce our food waste. It’s estimated that 7 million tonnes of household food waste is thrown away each year in the UK, most of which could have been eaten.

Want to stop the rot and prevent good food from going to landfill? Here’s our list of the top five most wasted foods and how to use them up.

#1 Bread
Over 240 million slices of bread are chucked away every year. Bread freezes really well, particularly for toast, so make sure you pop in the freezer if you’re not going to use it. Stale bread can be turned into croutons, breadcrumbs, eggy bread or even bread & butter pudding.
Recipe ideas: marmalade pudding | bread and butter pudding.
#2 Milk
Around 5.9 million glasses of milk are poured down the sink every year, but it’s so easy to use it up. You can use large quantities of milk in a fruit smoothie, béchamel sauce or make rice (or barley) pudding. If your milk is on the turn have a go at curd cheese or paneer.
Recipe ideas: rice pudding | oaty banana drop scones.
#3 Potatoes
We discard 5.8 million potatoes each year. Store potatoes in a dark place so they last longer. If they have been hanging around for a while, cook them all up and freeze in portions. Make potato cakes, fishcakes or gnocchi with leftover mash and bubble & squeak with leftover roasties. Par-boiled potatoes can be sliced and sautéed for a quick supper or roasted to make potato wedges (which can be cooked & frozen).
Recipe ideas: potato dauphinoise | three-root boulangere.
#4 Cheese
Cheese lasts a very long time, so there really is no excuse if you chuck it away! If it’s mouldy just scrape it off and use the rest in cooking. Cheese sauce is easy, just make a béchamel and add leftover scraps of any cheese – essential for lasagne, macaroni or cauliflower cheese and lots of other favourites. Finally, most cheese can be frozen.
Recipe ideas: apple, guiness and cheese soda bread | spinach and thyme pasties.
#5 Apples
A staggering 1.3 million apples are thrown away each year. To make them last longer, store in a cold, dark and well-ventilated place – make sure they aren’t touching each other and they are clean and dry.
Recipe ideas: apple snow | appley Chelsea buns.
   
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