Rewilding at home

“Rewilding is inspiring conservationists with its vision of restoring the lost abundance of nature. That same vision should apply to our homes and gardens, especially as these spaces are becoming important sanctuaries.”

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We can really help nature by letting it into our everyday lives and spaces a bit more:

A guide to rewilding your backyard – Vision Group for Sidmouth

Turning your area wild – Vision Group for Sidmouth

Ideas on how the Sid Valley can enhance its biodiversity – Vision Group for Sidmouth

Abandon the lawn mower and let nature take control – Vision Group for Sidmouth

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Here is a piece from Ros Coward writing in the Observer:

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Toads, spiders, daddy long legs, even mice: let them all share our homes

Species decline is being reversed in UK forests, highlands and rivers. But rewilding should start in our houses and gardens

This summer beavers have been granted “permanent right to remain” in their river home in east Devon, the first legalised reintroduction of an extinct British mammal. White storks reintroduced on the Knepp estate in West Sussex as part of another rewilding initiative have raised chicks and taken to the skies. Meanwhile, a major grant will bring European bison to woodland in Kent.

All this is exciting news for rewilding. But if we stand any chance of saving nature, maybe we also need to reverse species decline on our own doorsteps as much as we do in the countryside. Charity begins at home, they say. And perhaps rewilding does too. Ecocide isn’t just being committed in the countryside but also in our own homes, the result of our irrational hostility towards nature in domestic spaces…

Rewilding is inspiring conservationists with its vision of restoring the lost abundance of nature. That same vision should apply to our homes and gardens , especially as , with the massive threats from development to the wider countryside, these spaces are becoming important sanctuaries. There are steps we can take to do our bit : one would be overcoming the horror of insects and helping our children to do the same. Another would be persuading councils to prioritise species protection by preventing the loss of gardens and pressurising developers to provide homes for wildlife. In particular we can all do something individually like rewilding our gardens and including swift bricks or bird and bat boxes on available walls. I might even put up a platform on my chimney in the hope that one of Knepp’s storks – birds which choose to live close to humans – might take up residence.

Toads, spiders, daddy long legs, even mice: let them all share our homes | Wildlife | The Guardian

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photo: mouse, mammal, garden, rodent, button eyes | Pikist

   
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