Slowing down…

With more quiet time, more privacy, more stillness, we have an opportunity to think about who we are, as individuals and as a society.

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Alan Lightman, a physicist who teaches at MIT, writes in The Atlantic that “perhaps the slower lifestyle in these months can help put the pieces back together. And perhaps a more contemplative, deliberate way of living can become permanent:”

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The Virus Is a Reminder of Something Lost Long Ago

Innovation often arises in periods of adversity. In recent weeks, we have seen such welcome invention germinating in the horrendous crisis of the coronavirus. Consider, for example, the many new platforms for online teaching, or the use of cheap Bluetooth smart thermometers able to transmit a person’s fever and geolocation to a distant database, or members of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra performing together and apart from 29 different locations using their smartphones.

In bad times, innovation can occur in habits of mind as well as in new technologies. The frightening COVID-19 pandemic may be creating such a change now—by forcing many of us to slow down, to spend more time in personal reflection, away from the noise and heave of the world. With more quiet time, more privacy, more stillness, we have an opportunity to think about who we are, as individuals and as a society…

The Virus Is a Reminder of Something Lost Long Ago | theatlantic.com

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