Building with wood

using cross-laminated timber – instead of concrete and steel

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The construction industry is very, very wasteful:

The construction industry consumes 75% of the earth’s natural resources – Vision Group for Sidmouth

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There are some very clever ideas out there, though, on how to get around these fundamental issues:

Circular construction: a solution to embodied carbon in buildings – Vision Group for Sidmouth

The New Stone Age: ancient material: tiny carbon footprint – Vision Group for Sidmouth

New advances in timber construction – Vision Group for Sidmouth

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And today’s episode of the new Radio 4 series “39 Ways to Save the Planet” looked at timber:

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Wood for Good

We’re resourceful, adaptable and the smartest thing this planet has ever seen. We got ourselves into this mess but we can get ourselves out of it.

BBC Radio Four, in partnership with the Royal Geographical Society, presents 39 ideas to relieve the stress that climate change is exerting on the planet.

Trees soak up carbon dioxide, trees store carbon dioxide. So why not build with wood instead of concrete and steel? The usual reason is strength, but Dr Michael Ramage at Cambridge University has what he thinks is the answer- cross-laminated timber. It’s strong enough to build a skyscraper and replaces lots of that carbon from conventional building. Tom Heap and Dr Tamsin Edwards take a look at the global possibilities of cities built of wood.

BBC Radio 4 – 39 Ways to Save the Planet, Wood for Good

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And here is Dr Ramage giving a TED talk:

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Timber Towers of Tomorrow | Michael Ramage | TEDxCambridgeUniversity – YouTube

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Dr Ramage works within a dynamic part of the University:

Energy Transitions Research at the University of Cambridge

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Michael Ramage leads the Centre for Natural Material Innovation at Cambridge University. Trained as an architect and an engineer, he is a Reader in architecture and Engineering in the Department of Architecture, a fellow of Sidney Sussex College, and a founding partner of Light Earth Designs… His current research is focused on developing low-energy structural materials and systems in masonry, better housing in the developing world and improved engineered timber and bamboo through natural material innovation.

Michael H. Ramage, MArch, PhD — Department of Architecture

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image: Wood and Evolving Codes: The 2018 IBC and Emerging Wood Technologies: CE Center –

   
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