Shopping locally and ethically at Christmas

“Make conscious choices that will have a positive impact on the planet, such as buying sustainable brands, donating to charity or volunteering to do conservation work to offset the negative impact the unnecessary consumption of Black Friday has on the planet.”

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The Express reports on research showing that most of us are keen to shop local:

Brits across the country want to support local retailers this Christmas – despite the tough economic outlook. Research of 2,000 adults found 78 percent think it’s important to shop locally this festive season – and more than half (56 percent) are doing so to put money back into the local economy.
The research was commissioned by Smart Energy GB to launch its Small Business Hub, an online resource with advice and tips for small business owners.
Entrepreneur and TV star Deborah Meaden said: “It is clear that many small businesses are concerned about making enough sales over the Christmas period and managing other pressures, such as high energy bills. It is therefore heartening to see that many people really do value their local shops, and are willing to put their hands in their pockets to support them.”

More than three-quarters of Brits want to shop local this Christmas – and would spend more | City & Business | Finance | Express.co.uk

And more of us want to shop ethically:

Sustainable Gifts: 21 best eco-friendly Christmas gift ideas for 2022 | HELLO!

Best sustainable Christmas gifts 2022: 30 eco-friendly ideas |

An alternative to Black Friday is emerging:

These days, Black Friday is synonymous with frenzied shopping sprees, people queuing at stores or staying glued to screens to bag items at discounted prices that they don’t necessarily need, which often end up as landfill.

Refreshingly, there is a counter culture movement known as Green Friday, which encourages consumers not to make impulsive buys and instead to make conscious choices that will have a positive impact on the planet, such as buying sustainable brands, donating to charity or volunteering to do conservation work to offset the negative impact the unnecessary consumption of Black Friday has on the planet.

Here are a couple of ideas:

Host a preloved swapping party:

If you don’t want to miss the endorphin rush of finding a new outfit or device, host a Green Friday preloved items swapping party. One person’s trash can be another’s treasure, whether that’s a jumper that no longer fits or an old phone that’s just been upgraded

Shop independent:

Countless small businesses suffered during the last year as many were forced to close due to the pandemic, and they need all the help they can get. So walk, cycle or take the bus to your local independent shops or farmer’s market and spend your money there. Talk to the business owner to find out if they stock any ethical or locally made items. Stop for a cuppa and a slice of homemade cake at your local independent cafe while you’re at it. It’s not all bad this shopping malarkey.

How to support Green Friday on 26 November | BBC Countryfile Magazine | Countryfile.com

To finish, some more ideas from Mold Plastic Reduction:

   
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