Urban farming

Many consider the mass use of hydroponics as the future of agriculture.

On a smaller scale, companies like IKEA and Amazon are selling hydroponic systems that can be installed indoors.

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In the future, we will grow our food in our towns and cities, according to the Arch Daily:

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Urban Farming: Food Production in Community Parks and Private Gardens

As urban dwellers become more aware of the environmental impacts of food production and transportation, as well as the origin and security of what they consume, urban agriculture is bound to grow and attract public and political eyes. Bringing food production closer, in addition to being sustainable, is pedagogical. However, generally with small size and other restrictions, the concerns of growing food in cities differ somewhat from traditional farming.

Urban gardens can occupy a multitude of places and have varied scales – window sills and balconies, slabs and vacant lots, courtyards of schools, public parks and even unlikely places, such as subway tunnels. They can also be communitarian or private.

Hydroponics is the technique of growing plants without soil, where the roots receive a balanced nutrient solution that contains water and all the nutrients essential to the development of the plant. This may sound like a futuristic gardening concept, but hydroponics gardening is dated to the seventh century BC. However, the popularity and mass integration of hydroponics is new. Many consider the mass use of hydroponics as the future of agriculture. This is because recent studies on hydroponic agriculture have shown that it has many benefits, such as producing high quality plants, occupying less space and consuming fewer resources. In addition, hydroponic cultivation methods, in combination with vertical gardening, have helped expand the possibilities of urban gardening and indoor gardening – such as vertical farms, where plants are grown inside buildings and skyscrapers, called farmscrapers. This diagram shows the operation of hydroponic cultivation.

On a smaller scale, companies like IKEA and Amazon are selling hydroponic systems that can be installed indoors.

Urban Farming: Food Production in Community Parks and Private Gardens | ArchDaily

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photo: Hydroponics | The Learning Garden has a hydroponic growing s… | Flickr

   
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